Archive for the ‘The Secret World’ Category

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Since my days of playing World of Warcraft, through to my five year stint in LOTRO, I was an avid subscriber to the mmos I chose to play. I purchased the boxed, installed the games and month after month stumped up the required asking price for a subscription because I thought that the games would benefit from my financial support, plus the fact that f2p was never an option at that point as a valid business model for the games companies. These days however, almost every major mmo has a f2p option with others going f2p soon or already in the process of transitioning from a pure subscription business model to a hybrid of the two. A few mmos that are on the horizon are even going pure f2p, which you could have never imagined two or even three years ago. Creating a game in this way would have been seen as suicidal and just looking to fail. Not now.

When LOTRO moved from subscription to a hybrid, offering f2p to people who wanted to experience the world of middle earth and grind points to make purchases, or even buy points using real money, a lot of people thought it would spell the end of the mmo when in fact, Turbines revenue increased drastically. SWTOR moved from sub to hybrid model less than a year after it’s release due to a huge drop in subscriber numbers. I’ve never seen the game so busy now. Even Tera has recently moved to a f2p hybrid model and reports are that player base and income has almost doubled.

This beggers the question.. would a new, pure subscription model game be profitable and last?

There is a whole host of games out there, Triple A titles at that and a lot of them run a hybrid model where a vast number of the player base don’t necessarily play as f2p, but play as the hybrid where they spend money every so often and buy points, which they can spend on items or unlocks which are specific to their characters or play styles. I would say this is more considerate for people who don’t have extra income to expend every month of a game subscription and can buy parts of the game as and when they need them. There is also a section of the player base who just hate being tied into a contract, which is what subscribing is. Yes, it’s only a month to month rolling contract but it’s still a contract and that just doesn’t sit well with some people. Some games offer a lifetime pass, lotro being a good example of this. When the game was released they offered a lifetime subscription for £150, which basically means that you never pay a subscription again. All you pay for is any expansions that are released. GREAT DEAL!! you may say but not for the game company who has now switched to a hybrid model and no longer makes money from those players except once a year when they release an expansion. Turbine don’t like these people, lets at least be honest about it. Yeah sure, they give lifetime members 500 turbine points a month to spend in the store but they contribute nothing in terms of value to Turbine and lotro. People who still subscribe also receive those 500 points but contribute monthly to the running costs of the game and it’s upkeep. The people who spend real money on points are the cash earners for the company. 

But getting back to my point, With games on the market that offer f2p and hybrid models, which seem to be attracting the largest volumes of players due to these facts, I don’t think a game with a pure subscription base would get anywhere near enough revenue to be able to sustain this model, or even enough players to make it worth while.

What do you think?

As a little something extra,I’m going to list a few games which have changed from Subscription only to hybrid models so you can see the vast scope of this change of gaming business models.

LOTRO / Star Trek Online / SWTOR / Rift / Aion / Age of Conan / DDO / Tera / Final Fantasy XIV / The Secret World / DoTA 2 / League of Legends / Dust 514 / MechWarrior Online / Neverwinter (Yet to be released) / Planetside 2 / World of Tanks

These are just the BIG games, which could be described as A, AA or AAA titles. There is a further 4000+ games out there that are f2p.

Why would anyone pay a subscription anymore?

This time last year it seemed that nothing could pull me away from Lord of the Rings online, apart from the odd day playing SWTOR (which I still play to this day).  I was nothing but happy with this MMO. I would spend hours grinding reputation, crafting, levelling characters, raiding, talking to the friends I played with. It seemed that nothing could take me out that game. Nothing could tease me away from it. I was one hundred per cent not interested in any other game. Until the lag made it impossible for me to do these things that I love, but that is for another thread. I began looking and speaking to my fellow gamers. I began to pay complete attention toGuild Wars 2. It looked awesome! I couldn’t believe how blinded by LOTRO I was, people had tried to show me how great it was but I just wouldn’t listen. I brought out the credit card and paid for two copies that day. The beta weekend had just started so when people where playing I was downloading the client on two PC’s.  I never played until the next day and what I saw just baffled me to begin with. Everything was just so different from your generic MMO clone. Now don’t get me wrong I had not just played LOTRO and SWTOR up until this point, but I had also tried GWAionRiftDDO, and had a brief 12 hour shot of WoW. The first experience of this game smashed them all out of the ballpark.
This experience made me look around me. I wanted to experience it all. I did not want generic clones, or the holy trinity. I wanted to see what I was missing, see the game’s that I was not paying my full attention too. LOTRO’s lag issues though frustrating was the best thing to happen to my gaming life. I started paying more attention to SWTOR, with the storyline and space combat grabbing my attention and seeming new and shiny. I wanted to never be blinded by one singular MMO again. I was not content with open tapping, everyone receiving loot, open world environment, crafting changes, voice acting, space missions, and the ability to play a character how you wish.
So I heard about The Secret World going pay once play forever. I’d looked at this when it launched and thought it looked brilliant. But I did not want to pay for a subscription, especially when I had just bought GW2 which had no subscription attached to it.  The big appeal to me here is that I can role one character and be whatever role I want. I was an altaholic, always bringing up alts so we’d have the correct balance in raids. Do not get me wrong, I am not moaning about it. I was not held at gun point with someone screaming in my ears, “LEVEL A LORE-MASTER… HURRY UP!”.  I enjoyed it. But this game made me think that I would never need an alt because I could just level up every weapon within the game. Also there are no physical levels, you level up within your secret faction, be in Dragon, Templar or Illuminati. It is also an open world environment, with loot sharing and open tapping.  It is also set right now, so things that are global phenomenon’s such as Gangnam style are actually within this game. Its real world setting also seemed like a big change for me, and I enjoy wandering around London and using Google maps to see if it really does look like it does within the game.
So now with the MMO genre smashing down the very bounds that once made them all similar but with different settings what do you think? Do you feel saddened that all new MMO’s seem to be moving away from the bounds that once held them? Do you hope that new games to come are different from their counterparts or do you wish they’d all just stop bring out stuff that seems shiny and new but in your eyes is just a distraction from grinding end game until the new patch comes out? With even LOTRO jumping onto the open world environment train what will be next for MMO’s within the next year to come. 2012 changed my gaming life, let’s hope 2013 adds to my experience and the open world environment will not become the new generic clone.
Written by Emma McHugh